Marcia Weber Art Objects Contact the Gallery

 

 

Major offerings
by these artists:

Leroy Almon
Alpha Andrews

Hope Atkinson
Michael Banks
Rudolph Bostic
Anne Buffum
Richard Burnside
Lisa Cain
Tory Casey
Calvin Cooper
Cornbread
Ed Crowell II
Brenda Davis
Theresa Disney
Mike Esslinger

Howard Finster
Don Gahr
Sybil Gibson
Lee Godie
Dorethey Gorham
Annie Grgich
Haitian Artists
Herman Hayes
Spencer Herr
Teneco Hunter
James Harold Jennings
Jean Lake
Arbon Lane
Eric Legge
Woodie Long
Peter Loose
Annie Lucas
Charlie Lucas
Erika Marquardt
Frank McGuigan
R.A. Miller
Roy Minshew
Roger Mitchell
Bennie Morrison
J.B. Murry
Bruce New
Pak Nichols
B.F. Perkins
John Phillips
Sarah Rakes
Clay Rice
Ruth Robinson
William Sezah
Welmon Sharlhorne
Bernice Sims
Jimmie Lee Sudduth
Ionel Talpazan
Wanda Teel
Annie Tolliver
Mose Tolliver
Della Wells
Myrtice West
Mary Whitfield
David Zeldis
Malcah Zeldis

Other artists in
the Gallery::

Minnie Adkins
Anonymous Artists
Z.B. Armstrong
Pat Astoske
Ray Brown
Jerry Coker
Chuck Crosby
Vic Genaro
Alma Hall
Bertha Halozan
Joseph Hardin
Lonnie Holley
M.C. "5 Cent" Jones
Andy Kane
Fred Kessler
Reverend J.A. King
Calvin Livingstone
Hogg Mattingly
Jessie Lee Mitchell
Reginald Mitchell
Matilda Pennic
John Rhodes
Juanita Rogers
Jack Savitsky
Robert E. Smith
Julia Wilson Starke
Q.J. Stephenson
William Thompson
Tolliver Family
Bill Traylor
Daniel Troppy
Elmira Wade
Derek Webster
Fred Webster
Annie West
Willie White
Aritst Chuckie Williams
Artis Wright

Lonnie Holley

James Harold Jennings

Lonnie Holley was born the seventh of twenty-seven children in Birmingham, Alabama. He was moved around from foster home to foster home, until he ran away to Louisiana when he was fourteen. He drifted around the South working as a short-order cook in Louisiana, Florida and Alabama. Eventually Holley settled in Birmingham where he lives today with five of his fifteen children (and a grandchild.)

When his sister's two children died in a house fire in 1979, Holley became so depressed that he almost committed suicide. In the weeks that followed, he decided to do something constructive with his grief. As the family could not afford to buy tombstones for the children, he decided to make them himself.

"I asked God to give me something so that I may go to the top in life, and he did. I use the setting sun, the stars, the hills--all that has affected my imagination and what I put in my work.

The Tombstones were Holley's first works of art. He soon began to create an environment of found materials that he assembled in his yard. Eventually he took some of his carvings to the director of the Birmingham Museum of Art. who was so impressed that he contacted the Smithsonian. This resulted in Holly's work being included in the exhibition, "More Than Land and Sky: Art From Appalachia," which originated in 1981 at the Museum of American Art in Washington. Holley's work is in the permanent collection of the Birmingham Museum of Art after first being exhibited there in 1980.

For the first few years, Holley worked almost exclusively with industrial-made sandstone. He then began to work with other found materials such as discarded wire, scrap materials, and wooden objects. In what is considered a natural progression of his work, Holley eventually began to paint.

In his conceptualization of human and animal forms and his strong emphasis on the spiritual world and his ancestral heritage, Holley gives us a glimpse of West African, Egyptian and Pre-Columbian influences. Yet his more abstract, geometric forms relate to the works of other Twentieth Century artists such as Arp, Lipchitzs, Moore, and Picasso.

Holley has emerged from the depths of personal despair to be regarded as a major national artistic force in our day.

--G.H. Vander Elst (Interview Summer 1989)

Available Works